Odyssey Perennials

2018 ODYSSEY PERENNIALS CATALOG

Odyssey Perennials offered the following plants for shipping in spring 2018. PRICES INCLUDE SHIPPING for orders of $50 or more (shipping is $8 for all orders under $50). Orders of $100 or more receive discounts (see ORDERING GUIDELINES). We do not ship to states that ban importation of containerized plants: Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington.

All plants are in square, 2.5-inch, 3.5-inch-deep pots, unless otherwise indicated. Many plants have not yet bloomed in their containers, and a few seed-grown items may not be true to name. We'll let you know of any imposters (and we hope you'll return the favor). Clicking on a plant's name generates a Google search for that plant.

If you happen to be in the vicinity of the nursery, you're welcome to visit us, by appointment (see ORDERING GUIDELINES).

Herbaceous Perennials
Plant Name Price
Acanthus hungaricus
Full to part sun; light to medium soil; 3'×30"; June to August bloom
We have just a few seedlings of the hardiest, most spectacular, and least prickly of the bear's breeches. The rosettes of large, deeply lobed, dark green leaves are highly ornamental in themselves. But they're completely outdone in summer by massive otherwordly spikes of pink and white flowers hooded by maroon bracts. Balkans. Seedlings. Zone 5.
SOLD OUT
1/$9
Achillea ageratum 'Moonwalker'
Sun; light to medium soil; 28"×2'; June to August bloom
Plates of mustard-yellow flowers on non-flopping stems continue for most of the summer. With its long season of bloom and textured mounds of ferny, rich green foliage, this durable and dependable yarrow makes an excellent, unaggressive choice for grouping with spiky drought-tolerant things such as perovskias and salvias. S Europe. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Achillea nobilis
Sun; light soil; 20"×18"; June to August bloom
Although possessing finer, more silvery foliage, lacier white blooms, and a somewhat more restrained habit than its cousin Achillea millefolium, this southern European native is remarkably little-known in gardens. We suggest you help remedy this. S Europe. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Aconitum carmichaelii
Full to partial sun; humus-rich soil; 50"×2'; September to October bloom
For late-season perennial border drama nothing can surpass the lordly deep violet-blue spires of this classic monkshood. Plant it with white Japanese anemones and colchicums, and prepare to be gaped at. C China. Seedlings. Zone 3.
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Aconitum vulparia
Full to partial sun; humus-rich soil; 4'×18"; July to August bloom
Botanical paradoxes are such a kick. In this case it's one of the few monkshoods that flowers in something other than the blue/violet end of the spectrum. Pale yellow, to be exact. The branching spires arise from shaggy clumps of shredded foliage in early summer, rather early in the monkshood season. Europe. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Actaea racemosa (Cimicifuga racemosa)
Part shade; acid humusy soil; 5'×3'
Time was when this cimicifuga was the one that usually turned up on plant lists. These days it seems to be scarce in the trade compared to some other members of the genus (especially ones with brownish foliage). We're always glad to have some to offer, and to greet its midsummer flowers. C & E North America. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Actaea rubifolia (Cimicifuga rubifolia)  
Part shade; acid humusy soil; 4'×3'
Perhaps our favorite bugbane, much admired here for its dense compact habit, its frothy white spires in late summer, and its bold maple-like leaves that recall those of Rubus odoratus (thus the specific epithet). A local endemic of the Southeast and southern Central U.S., it has several disjunct, farflung populations in the wild. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Agastache rupestris
Sun; light soil; 3'×18"; June to September bloom
Fishing for something in salmon? How about summer-long spikes of narrowly tubular, soft orange flowers opening from contrasting purple calyces? Accented by hazy clumps of fine gray-green leaves? This shrubby perennial needs relatively porous soil in summer rainfall areas such as the eastern U.S. Southwest U.S. & N Mexico. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Agastache scrophulariifolia
Sun to part shade; most soils; 4-5'×2'
Bigger and bolder than Agastache foeniculum, this architectural perennial works well in naturalistic woodland edge or meadow plantings, as well as in informal perennial borders. Spikes of purplish white flowers occur for several weeks in late summer, and volunteers will occur if plants are not deadheaded. It's the Agastache thing to do. C & E U.S. Seedlings. Zone 3.
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Agastache 'Bolero'
Sun; light soil; 15"×12"; June to September bloom
The name might raise expectations of something relentlessly brash (at least if you're thinking along Ravelian lines). And perhaps the hummers that flock to it see it that way. Au contraire. Granted, the clumps of coppery-maroon leaves and compact spikes of wine-rose flowers certainly draw the eye, but not in a pounding over-the-top way. The whole plant is delightfully scented. All in all, it's a lovely long-blooming thing for relatively dry garden habitats. Southwest U.S. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Allium cernuum 'Pink Giant'
Full to partial sun; dry to moist soil; 16"×10"; June bloom
Arching clusters of relatively large, lilac-pink flowers splay like shooting stars from atop relatively loft scapes. This excellent seedling strain flowers very early in the nodding onion bloom season. N America. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Althaea cannabina
Sun; moist soil; 4'×2'; July to September bloom
Large airy clusters of soft-lavender-pink mallow-flowers with rose-pink centers open along tall wiry stems. The jagged, fingered leaves reminded at least one botanist of something more hallucinogenic. Whatever – it's a vision of loveliness in a perennial border or waterside planting. Zone 5.
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Alyssum repens
Sun; airy soil; 20"×18"; May bloom
A handsome spring-bloomer for the drought-tolerant perennial border, this giant among the alyssums produces generous globes of bright golden-yellow blooms on relatively stately stems. The specific epithet refers to the mats of natty gray-fuzzed leaves. This meritorious alyssum is rarely offered because it defies the diminutive generic stereotype. We like plants that defy stereotypes. W Asia to E Europe. Seedlings. Zone 6.
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Amsonia elliptica
Sun to light shade; most soils; 2'×2'; May to June bloom
From a genus that most of us think of as American, here's a rarely offered East Asian representative, which resembles an early-flowering, compact Amsonia tabernaemontana. The airy clusters of pale sky-blue starry-lobed flowers debut a week or two before most of the North American amsonias bloom. The narrowly oval leaves are typically amsonian, right down to their butter-yellow fall color. E Asia. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Antennaria neglecta
Sun to part shade; light, lean soil; 4"×1'; April to May bloom
An endearing carpeter native to much of temperate North America, field pussytoes forms dense, slowly spreading mats of small spoon-shaped silver-gray leaves, surmounted in spring by small gray-white powderpuff flowerheads on fuzzy upright stems. If you're looking for a small-scale groundcover for dry sun or semi-shade, this should be near the top of your list. Seedlings. Zone 3.
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Antennaria plantaginifolia
Sun to part shade; light soil; 8"×1'; April to May bloom
One of the best (and least known) native perennials for dry soil, even in shade, this pussytoe forms loose mats of tongue-shaped, tomentose leaves that do indeed give the impression of a Plantaginea that's gone fuzzy. The fuzzy continues when the silver-gray flowerheads (with a high cute quotient, of course) arise on short stalks in spring. C & E North America. Divisions. Zone 3.
1/$7 SOLD OUT
1/$9
Arnoglossum reniforme
Full to part sun; moist fertile soil; 7'×3'; June to August bloom
A massive forb from moist open woodlands of the central and eastern U.S., great Indian plantain forms imposing clumps of bold rounded foliage, which give rise (and we meen RISE) to statuesque, leafy stalks topped by branching clusters of white flowers. It's the sort of thing that might result from a liaison between a ligularia and a eupatorium. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Asclepias exaltata
Partial shade; moist fertile soil; 4'×2'; May to June bloom
We're always delighted to happen upon a colony of tall milkweed, either in the wild or in the garden. In both locales its bold paired leaves and drooping starbursts of creamy white flowers (in late spring) combine beautifully with large ferns such as Osmunda claytoniana. Milkweeds aren't just for the sunny garden! C & E N America. Seedlings. Zone 3.
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Asclepias speciosa
Sun; coarse soil; 30"×2'; July to August bloom
This is essentially the Western analog of Asclepias purpurascens, bearing dense spheres of somewhat paler flowers on clumping stems. Our plants are from seed collected from the rainy side of the Cascades in western Oregon, and are coping well with our moisture regimes here. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Asclepias verticillata
Sun; light soil; 18"×2'; July to August bloom
Expanding clumps of needle-like foliage held on upright stems make a wonderful textural complement to bold-leaved meadow- and prairie-dwellers such as silphiums and rudbeckias. The frothy sprays of white flowers are also pleasing. C & E N America. Seedlings. Zone 3.
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Aster laevis (Symphyotrichum laeve)
Sun to light shade; any soil; 3'×18"; August to September bloom
Smooth purple-flushed stems with waxy blue-gray leaves hold airy clusters of delicate pale lavender-blue flowers in late summer and early fall. This beautiful thing is tough as nails, tolerating drought and other exigencies, and is equally at home in a perennial border or a hell strip planting. E & C North America. Seedlings. Zone 2.
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Aster sericeus (Symphyotrichum sericeum)
Sun; light soil; 2'×1'; August to September bloom
The handsome, silky, silver-gray leaves of this Midwestern native distinguish it as one of the few asters with eye-catching flowers AND foliage. The former are a lavender blue that tones perfectly with the shimmering leaves. C North America. Seedlings. Zone 3.
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Aster shortii (Symphyotrichum shortii)  
Part shade; light to medium soil; 3'×18"; August to October bloom
Woodland asters are a must for the fall shade garden. Here's an especially handsome and little-known one with relatively large, inch-wide, lilac-blue "daisies." The rosettes of cordate leaves recall those of Aster macrophyllus. C & SE North America. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Boltonia decurrens
Sun; moist soil; 5'×3'
Rather than the usual boltonian white, the abundant small daisy-flowers of this imposing Midwestern native are pale violet-pink. A great companion for eupatoriums and heleniums and other moisture-loving late-blooming U.S. natives. We have just a few plants to offer this year. C U.S. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Buglossoides purpurocaerulea
Sun to light shade; light to medium soil; 18" (in flower)×3'
This lovely but little-known deciduous groundcover from the borage tribe makes an excellent carpeter for areas where its trailing stems have room to romp. Mats of dark green willowy leaves are spangled with gentian-blue flowers in spring and early summer. Excellent for planting over colchicums. Europe to W Asia. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Callirhoe triangulata Sun; light soil; 18"×2' July to August bloom
Literally standing apart from other Callirhoe species, this native of arid Plains habitats holds its wine-cup flowers on semi-erect (rather than lax) stems. It's the last of the genus to bloom, sometimes continuing into fall. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Campanula sarmatica
Sun; light to medium soil; 18"×12"; June to July bloom
Proportionately large, lavender-blue bell-flowers contrast tellingly with rosettes of gray-green leaves. One of the best (and best-behaved) front- (or mid-) border campanulas, it's surprisingly rare in American gardens. Caucasus. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Cardamine pratensis
Part shade; moist soil; 8"×6"; April to May bloom
Quite a few plant fanciers confuse other, weedy cardamines (such as C. hirsuta) with this lovely and well-behaved woodlander, which is native to much of the upper Northern Hemisphere. Its clusters of relatively large, pinkish to purple flowers are held above lacy rosettes of pinnate leaves. Self-sowing occurs, but not prolifically. Seedlings. Zone 3.
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Centaurea atropurpurea
Sun; light to medium soil; 4'×2'; June to August bloom
Shocks of brushy burgundy-red blooms emerge from large artichoke-like involucres held on tall wiry stems. Everything below the flowers, including the deeply incised foliage, is dusted with silvery fuzz. Balkans. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Centaurea dealbata
Sun; light to medium soil; 30"×2'; June to August bloom
We're suckers for centaureas, and this charming species with fuzzy rich rose-pink blossoms happened early on in our addiction. Large, deeply cleft leaves with gray undersides add to the display. NW Iran to Caucasus. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Claytonia sibirica (Montia sibirica)
Partial shade; moist to average soil; 4"×8"; April to July bloom
An entirely different and more substantial thing than eastern U.S. relatives such as Claytonia virginica, this native of the Far West and Far East forms rosettes of dark, tongue-shaped leaves whose fleshy texture betrays their Portulacaceae heritage. They also provide a pleasing accent for the dainty, light lavender-pink flowers, which continue for many weeks after the eastern claytonias have faded from the scene. This short-lived perennial usually casts a few seedlings to carry on. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Clematis songorica
Sun; porous soil; 3'×3'; July to August bloom
A clematis from the shrubby side of the genus, this Central Asian native does lots of ornamental things from spring, when its handsome gray-green leaves expand, to summer, when it covers itself with starry white blooms, to fall, when the flowers progress to quilly white seedheads. These plants are from wild-collected seed. Zone 4.
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Coreopsis major
Sun to light shade; lean soil; 32"×18"; June to August bloom
The summer-long masses of sunny yellow flowers say "coreopsis" – but the six-lobed leaf-whorls that collar the upright stems are a thing unto themselves. It's one of those plants that delights not only in its beauty but also in the bafflement it causes. Moderately rhizomatous. Mid-Atlantic to SE. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Coreopsis palmata
Sun; lean soil; 30"×3'; June to August bloom
Large, 2-inch wide, bright yellow blooms and finely divided leaves on tall, rapidly proliferating stems give the appearance of an oversized Coreopsis verticillata. Prefect for combining in large borders with other vigorous prairie and meadow plants. C U.S. Seedlings. Zone 3.
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Cyclamen purpurascens
Part shade; humus-rich soil; 4"×6"; July to September bloom
We can never have too many of this wonderful, hardy, nearly evergreen cyclamen, which throws multiple summer flushes of rosy-purple flowers where happy. The leathery, rounded leaves are sometimes accented with silver veins, as is the case with these seedlings. Plant the tubers several inches deep. S Europe. Zone 5.
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Dianthus cruentus
Sun; light to medium soil; 2'×1'
Among our favorite Dianthus are those atypical few that produce brush-like clusters of fiery flowers on tall wiry stems in summer. Here, as you may have inferred, is one of them. The rich carmine blooms tone beautifully with the spiky blue-green leaves, and combine pleasingly with pale yellow and deep blue things. Balkans. Seedlings. Zone 6.
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Dictamnus albus var. purpureus
Sun to light shade; fertile soil; 30"×2'; May to June bloom
Gas plant is always in demand yet always hard to come by because of its slowness from seed. Here are some second-year seedlings for those of you who are okay with waiting a couple years for full development and bloom. Once established, plants will bear purple-stemmed spires of lepidopteran, lilac-pink blooms in late spring above lustrous mounds of healthy deep green foliage – and they'll continue to do so for many years to come. Some humans experience blistering and other unpleasant dermatitic symptoms upon contact with this plant, so handle (or not) with care. S Europe and Asia. Seedlings. Zone 3.
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Digitalis grandiflora
Sun to part shade; light to medium soil; 2'×1'; May to July bloom
One of the longest lived and showiest foxgloves (and also one of our favorites), this species lifts spires of large moonlight-yellow bellflowers in late spring and summer. The rich-green, deeply veined leaves have a boraginaceous look about them. Eurasia. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Digitalis mariana ssp. heywoodii (Digitalis purpurea ssp. heywoodii)
Sun to light shade; light soil; 30"×15";
Striking in foliage and in flower, with spires of soft lilac-pink thimbles floatinng above rosettes of fuzzy silvery lambs-ear-like leaves. Likes well-drained conditions in summer rainfall areas. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Digitalis × mertonensis
Sun to part shade; light to medium soil; 30"×15"; June to July bloom
The hybrid between Digitalis grandiflora and Digitalis purpurea is justly prized for its large strawberry-ice-cream-pink thimbles on tall spikes over handsome mounds of bold, vein-creased leaves. Separate and replant offsets in fall. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Digitalis purpurea 'Snow Thimble'
Sun to part shade; light to medium soil; 40"×15";
Tall spires of pure white bells distinguish this outstanding seedling strain of common foxglove. Zone 5.
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Digitalis thapsi Spanish Peaks
Sun to light shade; light to average soil; 2'×1'; June to July
Smaller, fuzzier in leaf, and far more perennial in lifestyle than Digitalis purpurea, Spanish foxglove makes a splendid subject for the mid-border, providing season-long display with its compact spires of rose-purple flowers in late spring and its persistent rosettes of felted gray-green foliage. Iberian Peninsula. Seedlings. Zone 6.
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Dracocephalum rupestre
Sun to light shade; coarse humusy soil; 12"×12"; July to August bloom
Often grown as Dracocephalum grandiflorum, which it resembles (which is a good thing). Disproportionately large, sky-blue, hooded flowers with prominent lips cluster above rosettes of crinkled leaves. Central Asia. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Dystaenia takesimana
Sun to partial shade; moist fertile soil; 5'×2'; July to September bloom
Almost unknown in Western gardens, this member of the parsley family produces textural clumps of edible celery-like leaves, giving rise in summer to lacy white domed flowerheads on tall upright stems. Native to Ulleung, a remote island off the coast of South Korea. Seedlings. Deep 3.5-inch pots. Zone 5.
1/$9 SOLD OUT
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Echinacea simulata
Sun; light to medium soil; 2'×18"; May to June bloom
Narrow, rich-pink petals cascade from large domed cones in late spring above a shock of narrow upright basal leaves. This elegant and exceptionally early-blooming purple coneflower is excellent with Baptisia australis and other June-blooming prairie natives. And of course it's a favorite of butterflies, and flower arrangers. Central and SE U.S. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Echium russicum (Pontechium maculatum)
Sun; light soil; 2'×1'; June bloom
Think of this as a showier, rarer, deep rose-pink, reliably perennial version of common bugloss. We have 4-year-old plants here at the nursery that show no sign of flagging (the seedlings offered here are 2-year-olds, guaranteed to be tantrum-free). E Europe. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Epilobium angustifolium
Sun; light to medium soil; 4'×3'; July to August bloom
Give fireweed lots of room to maneuver, and it will give you majestic spikes of large purple-pink flowers through much of late summer. Solitary stems pop up in gaps here and there, sometimes several feet from the mother plant, providing splashes of color that surprise and delight. We've had great success with it in sandy soil. Upper North America. Seedlings. Zone 3.
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Eriophorum vaginatum
Sun; damp, acidic soil; 10"×1'; June to July bloom
The perfect thing for a damp path-side habitat, this native of soggy Northern habitats is an arresting sight in summer when it displays large downy white seedheads above its tussocks of grassy leaves. Upper Northern Hemisphere. Seedlings. Zone 3.
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Eryngium spinalba
Sun; gritty soil; 15"×15"; June to July bloom
An exquisite study in silvery spininess. Finely lobed, blue-green, spine-tipped leaves give rise to silvery, thimble-shaped flowerheads with spiky collars of spiny silver-white bracts. W. Alps. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Eryngium yuccifolium
Sun; light to medium soil; 3'×15"; July to August bloom
As with all New World eryngiums, this prairie native does its foliar spininess in yucca style, sending up rosettes of long, strap-shaped, sawtoothed leaves in spring. Bristly, spherical, gray-blue flowerheads in summer stylishly reveal the true identity of this member of the parsley family. C & E U.S. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Gentiana lutea
Full sun; humus-rich soil; 40"×2'; June to August bloom
This astonishing plant ventures well outside gentian norms, both in its lofty spikes of whorled, butter-yellow star-flowers, and its large pleated blue-green leaves that suggest a gussied-up plantain. European mountains. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Geum ex 'Jess'
Full to part sun; moist humus-rich soil; 1'×1'; May to July bloom
A selection or hybrid of Geum rivale, 'Jess' produces delightful fringed apricot-pink bells with burgundy calyces that nod from purplish stems. We're not sure what Jess's seedling offspring will do this time around, but in our experience they're likely to be well worth the purchase price. Only a few in stock. Seedlings. Zone 4.
SOLD OUT
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Gillenia trifoliata
Sun to part shade; any soil; 30"×30"; June to July bloom
Starry clouds of delicate white blooms envelop lush clumps of lacy textured foliage in early summer. The leaves turn brilliant hues in fall. Few perennials can match this tough and long-lived perennial for spring to fall ornamental value. Give it a couple years to reach its glorious full stature. C and E U.S. Zone 4
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Gypsophila pacifica
Sun; most soils; 3'×30"; July to August bloom
Light pink flowers – larger than those of Gypsophila paniculata – are abundantly borne in misty panicles through much of summer. This relatively little-known baby's breath is also more adaptable than its white-flowered cousin, taking well to relatively heavy, acidic soil. E Asia. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Haplophyllum suaveolens
Sun; gritty soil; 15"×15"; June to July bloom
Haplophyllum contains a number of handsome species that bear clusters of bright yellow flowers on upright stems clad with blue-green leaves. All are native to Mediterranean and steppe regions, which is good if you garden in gritty soil or in a relatively arid climate. W Turkey. Seedlings. Zone 6.
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Hedysarum caucasicum
Sun; gritty soil; 2'×2'; July to August bloom
Crowded racemes of rose-purple pea-flowers stand above handsome clumps of blue-green, pinnate foliage of the sort that you'd find on a top-rung Jacob's ladder. (Pauses to catch breath.)Only a few to sell this year. E Europe. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Heliopsis helianthoides 'Prima Ballerina'
Sun; moist fertile soil; 3'×2'
This new, floriferous seedling strain produces quantities of semi-double, intensely golden-yellow "sunflowers" on sturdy, relatively compact plants. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Helleborus foetidus Hungarian form
Partial shade; most soils; 2'×18"; March to April bloom
Of Northwest Hungarian ancestry, this excellent "bearclaw" form has glaucous, narrowly dissected leaves and pale charteuse, maroon-rimmed flowers. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Helleborus × hybridus red-flowered form
Partial shade; most soils; 18"×18"; March to April bloom
These seedlings derive from a form of Lenten rose that has cupped, rich maroon-red flowers. They should be beauties. Zone 5.
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Horminum pyrenaicum
Full to part sun; humus-rich soil; 1'×1'
Dapper matted rosettes of crinkled leaves are adorned in spring with miniature spikes of deep violet dragonhead flowers. A delight (and a rarely available one at that). Self-sows in favorable sites. Alps. Seedlings. Zone 6.
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Hylomecon japonicum  
Part shade; humusy soil; 10"×18"
Dazzling golden-yellow poppy-flowers glow above leafy, slowly colonizing clumps in spring. Summer-dormant. A splendid and little-known perennial for the shade garden. E Asia. Divisions. Zone 5.
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Inula orientalis 'Grandiflora'
Sun; light to medium soil; 20"×18"; June to July bloom
Large sunny "daisies" with frilly, ribbon-thin, orange-yellow petals and rich orange discs open from felted buds in early summer. The fuzzy gray-green foliage amplifies the effect. Seedlings. Zone 3.
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Inula verbascifolia
Sun; lean soil; 12"×12"; June to July bloom
The rosettes of felted, silvery leaves do indeed suggest something in the way of a dainty, rarefied Verbascum. That is, until early summer, when they give rise to sprays of orange-yellow pompons that are unmistakably of the Composite tribe. SE Europe to W Turkey. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Isodon japonicus
Partial shade; most soils; 2'×18"; July to August bloom
Summer- and fall-blooming, shade-friendly perennials from East Asia have been a thing lately, and rightly so. Among the best of them are several species that travel under Rabdosia or Isodon, depending on which direction the taxonomic winds are blowing. The species offered here (and not offered much of anywhere else) produces airy candelabras of pale lavender flowers in late summer, just when shady areas of the garden could use some color. E Asia. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Kalimeris pinnatifida ex Japan
Sun; most soils; 18"×18"; July to October bloom
This exceptionally long-blooming perennial is almost universally represented in horticulture by the double-flowered white pompons of the cultivar 'Hortensis'. Here we offer something more characteristic of the species, grown from wild-collected seed. Sprays of, pale-lilac, inch-wide "daisies" continue from summer into fall. Japan. Seedlings. Zone 6.
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Leibnitzia anandria
Full to part sun; most soils; 8"×12"; May/June ray-flowers; August/Septembers rayless flowers
This fascinating and singular East-Asian native produces white "daisies" with pink reverses on low stems in late spring, only to send up a second set of rayless disks on somewhat taller scapes in late summer. The late-season flowers are self-fertile and ripen into downy spherical seed-heads. All this happens above a condensed mat of fresh-green, lyre-shaped leaves. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Leucanthemum graminifolium
Full sun; light soil; 12"×12"; May to July bloom
Beautifully proportioned "daisies" with broad yellow discs and pure white, spoon-shaped petals are poised on wiry stems. This happens above clumps of finely incised foliage that does indeed have a gramineous look to it. S Central Europe. Seedlings. Zone 6.
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Lewisia cotyledon
Part shade; gritty fertile soil; 6"×6";
These seedlings of this extraordinary Westerner will flower in various shades and patterns of orange and salmon-pink, above the usual rosettes of succulent foliage. Quite adaptable to gardens in non-Western areas of the upper U.S., provided it has porous soil (think humusy grit) and shelter from hot sun. Seedlings. W U.S. Zone 5.
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Linaria dalmatica
Full sun; most soils; 3'×15"; June to October bloom
Steeples of lemon-yellow flowers debut in early summer and repeat until frost. Wonderful clump-forming (NOT rhizomatous) perennial for season-long color in the border or cottage garden. Cut plants back plants in midsummer for a second flush of growth and bloom. A modest (not prolific) self-sower. E Europe. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Lobelia cardinalis
Sun to part shade; moist, humus-rich soil; 40"×12"; August to September bloom
It's always a thrill to happen upon the brilliant flowers of this perennial favorite, whether in the garden or the wild. Although usually short-lived, it often self-sows, especially in moist open soil. C & E N America. Zone 2.
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Lobelia siphilitica 'Mistassinica'
Sun to part shade; moist, humus-rich soil; 8"×1'; July to September bloom
A mutant, late-blooming Mazus? Au contraire. Paradoxically, this is a dwarf form of the great blue lobelia, and a lovely one at that. It increases steadily into leafy clumps that erupt in full-sized flowers in late summer, when blue blooms are often in short supply. What a wonderful way to stump your gardening buds. Seedlings (true to name). Zone 3.
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Malva moschata f. alba
Sun to light shade; most soils; 2'×2'; June to September bloom
White mallow-flowers through much of summer over clumps of finely divided leaves. An old-time cottage garden favorite, it's relatively hard to find in nurseries these days. Yet it remains one of the best sources of season-long color for the perennial border. Self-sows modestly. Europe. Seedlings. Zone 3.
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Manfreda virginica (Agave virginica)
Sun to light shade; light soil; 5'×15"; July to August bloom
What true plant addict would NOT want to grow a deciduous agave that is hardy to Zone 5 and that produces towering wands lined with sweetly fragrant, spidery green flowers? These seedlings have blue-green leaves, with minimal spotting. C & E U.S. Zone 5.
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Melanthium woodii (Veratrum woodii)
Partial shade; humus-rich soil; 5'×2'; July to August bloom
Speaking of cool plants, did we mention that we love all things melanthiacious? This is one of those species that oscillates between Melanthium and Veratrum, depending on which faction of taxonomists is in control. The broad, pleated leaves are of classic Veratrum form, and the tall branching panicles of black-purple flowers evoke Veratrum nigrum. We offer seedlings that are heading for their third year, which is a year or two away from flowering size. C & SE U.S. Zone 5.
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Milium effusum 'Aureum'
Part shade; moist humus-rich soil; 2'×18"
Low shaggy clumps of broad, grassy, chartreuse-gold leaves illuminate the shade garden in spring and fall, deepening to lime-green during the heat of summer. Plants double down on the display in late spring, producing a haze of tiny golden flowers, on golden, 2-foot-tall stems. A somewhat short-lived perennial, Bowles' golden grass usually persists by siring a few self-sown seedlings. North temperate zone. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Monarda bradburiana    
Partial shade to full sun; average soil; 18"×2'
Our favorite beebalm blooms a month earlier than the common garden hybrids, on much denser and more compact(and noninvasive) plants, with mildew-resistant foliage that flushes bronze in spring. The pale lilac flowers peak in mid to late spring, and are subtended by showy purple bracts that continue the display after the petals drop. Just wonderful. C & E North America. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Nepeta govaniana
Full to partial sun; humus-rich soil; 30"×2'; July to August bloom
The aristocat of the nepeta tribe. Airy clusters of soft yellow, gold-blotched flowers float above clumps of yellow-green leaves. Native to Himalayan foothills, it does best where summers are relatively moderate. E Pakistan to N India. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Patrinia intermedia
Sun; light soil; 12"×12"; June to August bloom
Picture a dwarf, ferny-leaved Patrinia scabiosifolia, with branching flower clusters of the same zingy-yellow in summer. We consider it a highly ornamental picture indeed – and one you're not going to see in many gardens, given the rarity of this species in cultivation. Just a few to sell this year. C Asia. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Patrinia villosa
Full to part sun; most soils; 30"×18"; July to September bloom
We first made our acquaintance with this charming late-bloomer via the erstwhile We-Du Nursery, which specialized (as we do) in little-known marvels. Essentially a white-flowered analog of the equally valuable Patrinia scabiosifolia, it provides much-needed late-season texture and color with its lacy flowerheads on strong upright stems. Its rosettes spread by short runners, so it's also useful as a ground cover. E Asia. Divisions. Zone 5.
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Penstemon digitalis 'Husker Red'
Full sun; most soils; 3'×18"; June to July bloom
Familiar – but still valuable – burgundy-leaved form of foxglove penstemon. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Penstemon murrayanus
Full sun; gritty soil; 3'×1'; May to June bloom
This astonishing beardtongue sends up tall stems with clusters of glowing coral-red flowers collared by pairs of perfoliate, blue-green, eucalyptian leaves. It's a short-lived perennial here. SE U.S. Seedlings. Zone 6.
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Penstemon tubaeflorus
Full sun; light to medium soil; 3'×1'; May to June bloom
If you need to be disabused of the notion that penstemons are only for arid gardens, this gorgeous Plains native would be one good place to start. Showy spires crowded with snowy flowers make their debut just as other late-spring favorites such as Baptisia australis and Amsonia tabernaemontana come into bloom. The possibilities should be obvious. C U.S. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Phlox maculata
Full sun to light shade; average to moist soil; 3'×2'; July to September bloom
Seedlings of unadulterated wild sweet william. The fragrant rose-pink flowers debut a couple weeks before garden phlox commences bloom. The show continues for a couple months – with virtually no powdery mildew to spoil the display. C & E North America. Seedlings. Zone 3.
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Pimpinella major 'Rosea'
Full to partial sun; medium to moist soil; 3'×15"; June to August bloom
Umbels of rose-pink flowers, aging to pale pink, continue for many weeks in summer, making a splendid partner for campanulads and early aconitums and the like. The ferny foliage is nice too. Highly sought after, but rarely available. Europe. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Platycodon grandiflorus 'Hakone White'
Full to part sun; light to medium soil; 20"×1'; July to September bloom
The white form of the double form of balloon flower. Doubly different. China to Manchuria. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Polemonium yezoense 'Purple Rain'
Full to part sun; moist humusy soil; 20"×1'; June to July bloom
The newly emerging leaves of this seedling strain are heavily suffused with maroon, adding a touch of drama to the usual polemonian foliar elegance. Clusters of relatively large, bowl-shaped, sky-blue flowers are borne on compact, sturdy, black-purple stems in late spring and early summer. Japan. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Primula denticulata dark form
Part shade; humus-rich soil; 10"×10"; April to May bloom
The spherical flowerheads of this showy and easy-to-grow species come in a rainbow of delicious colors. In this case, the color is a rich lilac-purple, which contrasts beautifully with the standard-issue yellow eyes. C Asia. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Primula denticulata 'Ruby'
Part shade; humus-rich soil; 10"×10"; April to May bloom
Here, the floral color is a glowing cherry-red (with yellow eyes, of course). Further evidence that you can never have too many drumstick primroses! C Asia. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Primula denticulata 'Snowball'
Part shade; humus-rich soil; 10"×10"; April to May bloom
As you might have guessed, this form produces generous spherical heads of white, yellow-eyed flowers. C Asia. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Primula elatior
Part shade; moist humusy soil; 8"×10"; April to May bloom
Every shady cottage garden could use a few oxlips. The one-sided heads of pale yellow flowers blend beautifully with pulmonarias and mertensias and other deep blue spring things. N Europe. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Primula japonica 'Postford White'
Part shade to sun; damp humusy soil; 2'×1'; May to June bloom
Coming true from seed, the classic white-flowered form of Japanese primrose produces candelabras of large white flowers with orange centers, held high over shaggy rosettes of tongue-shaped leaves. E Asia. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Primula veris ssp. macrocalyx
Part shade; humus-rich soil; 1'×1'; May bloom
Yes, the flowers DO have relatively large, funnel-shaped calyces, with relatively large, orange-yellow corollas protruding from their tips. The shaggy, shooting-star clusters of downward-angled blooms appear in mid- to late spring. W Asia. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Pseudofumaria lutea (Corydalis lutea)
Sun to shade; most soils; 1'×1'; perpetual bloom
Formerly Corydalis lutea, it remains one of the most adaptable, durable, floriferous plants for just about any garden niche, self-sowing (via ants) into nooks and crannies from which it prolifically produces its bright yellow blooms over clumps of lacy leaves. S Europe. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Pycnanthemum muticum
Full to part sun; most soils; 3'×3'
Wonderful for massing in habitat plantings and butterfly borders and the like, where its silvery flower bracts create a melting misty effect in late summer. They clasp a cluster of small pinkish flowers, which are bee and butterfly magnets. It spreads steadily by rhizomes, so combine it with other outwardly mobile plants. C & E U.S. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Ranunculus gramineus
Sun to light shade; coarse moist soil; 1'×6" May to June bloom
Low rosettes of narrow, lance-shaped, gray-green leaves look for all the world like a mini-yucca. But the few-flowered racemes of brassy yellow buttercups in late-spring shout "ranunculus." A cool little plant, that goes dormant after blooming. SW Europe. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Ranunculus platanifolius
Full to part sun; moist soil; 30"×2'; June to July bloom
This white buttercups of this close relative of Ranunculus aconitifolius are held high on wiry stems over spreading clumps of jagged foliage of the aconitish sort. Rarely offered, and we have just a few to sell this year. C & E Europe. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Rudbeckia grandiflora 'Sundance'
Sun; light to medium soil; 40"×2' August to October bloom
Large, show-stopping black-eyed Susans with down-swept, golden-yellow petals and prominent, maroon-brown cones strut their stuff in late summer, when much of the rest of the perennial border is flagging. Spreads by short rhizomes and self-sowing. C U.S. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Salvia sclarea var. turkestanica
Sun; airy soil; 4'×2'
Few herbaceous perennials make a bolder early summer statement than clary sage. Whorls of pinkish-white flowers nest inside huge, showy, lilac-pink bracts, which continue the display after the flowers themselves are spent. The branching flower stems arise from substantial clumps of pungent, wrinkled, gray-green leaves. This short-lived perennial reliably self-sows. Mediterranean to W Asia. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Salvia sclarea 'Vatican White'
Sun; airy soil; 3'×2'
This angelic white-flowered, white-bracted form of f. turkestanica is one of the things that the well-dressed moon border (or perennial bed or cottage garden) will be wearing this season. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Sanguisorba tenuifolia 'Purpurea'
Sun to light shade; moist humusy soil; 3'×18"
We love sanguisorbas, whose colorful thimble-like flower clusters float above lush rosettes of pinnate foliage of the sort that you would find on the finest mountain ash. The elongated, tail-like, maroon-black thimbles of this splendid example are borne in late summer, in telling counterpoint to the clumps of gray-green leaves. NE Asia. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Saruma henryi
Partial shade; most soils; 2'×18", May to July bloom
A showy-flowered twist on Asarum, even in name, this relatively recent introduction to horticulture forms hummocks of fuzzy, gray-green, heart-shaped leaves which indeed look for all the world like an asarum, until the astonishing butter yellow blooms appear at the stem tips, triggering fits of plant lust. Not only that, it's tough and adaptable, and self-sows in favorable sites. China. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Saxifraga pensylvanica (Micranthes pensylvanica)
Partial shade; moist soil; 30"×18", May to June bloom
One of the best foliage plants for waterside plantings, this charming native forms impressive rosettes of fuzzy paddle-shaped foot-long leaves, which give rise to tall wands of frothy greenish-white flowers in late spring. C & E N America. Seedlings. Zone 3.
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Saxifraga rotundifolia
Partial shade; moist soil; 18"×18", June to July bloom
Another charmer for the waterside, seeding itself around and filling gaps with mats of toothed, kidney-shaped leaves, that are overtopped with clouds of dainty white, red-speckled flowers for several weeks in late spring and early summer. European uplands. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Scabiosa ochroleuca 'Moon Dance'
Sun; light to medium soil; 10"×10'"; June to September bloom
Another long-time fave of ours, this pale-yellow-flowered species is highly variable in growth habit and floral display, so a good form – such as this compact seedling strain – is essential. It's splendid with blue-flowered companions (might we suggest Scabiosa 'Butterfly Blue' and a dwarf platycodon for starters)? Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Scutellaria baicalensis
Sun to light shade; light to medium soil; 1'×1'; July to August bloom
This undemanding little skullcap makes a great ground layer plant for dry sunny borders, where it often seeds itself around into open patches, cottage-garden style, forming low thatches of narrow leaves topped in late summer by stubby spikes of violet-blue, white-lipped snapdragons. E Asia. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Scutellaria ovata
Sun to partial shade; most soils; 15"×15";
Visitors to the nursery are always drawn to the textural, multi-hued foliage of this, our favorite skullcap. Its felted leaves flush bronzy maroon with a pewter overlay in spring and early summer, eventually morphing to bright green. Spikes of lavender-blue flowers provide another flush of color in midsummer. C & E U.S. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Silene asterias  
Full sun; moist fertile soil; 3'×1'
Spherical 2-inch heads of luminous cerise flowers with blue anthers arise on tall wiry scapes in late spring, giving the impression of a high-rise Dianthus cruentus. The ground-hugging rosettes of dark green leaves do not look at all dianthian, however. Plants will self-sow in favorable garden habitats. Another rare beauty. SE Europe. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Silene atropurpurea
Full sun; light soil; 1'×1'
This recently introduced and highly commendable rock garden subject produes cheerful sprays of rosy purple flowers in spring above handsome rosettes of relatively broad gray-green leaves. Most references list this as a subspecies of Lychnis viscaria, but in ornamental effect it's quite different (and more elegant). Balkans. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Silene delavayi
Full sun; light soil; 1'×1', July bloom
We have just a few plants to offer of this comely alpine-meadow-dweller from Yunnan. The chubbily trumpet-shaped flowers have purple-striped, cylindrical calyces with a frilly cup-shaped topknot of reddish-purple petals. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Silphium mohrii  
Sun; fertile, well-aerated soil; 4'×3'; July to September bloom
One of the rarest and classiest of the silphiums, this SE U.S. endemic bears 2-inch-wide, pastel-yellow "sunflowers" that are of a softer, more blendable hue than those of most others in the tribe. They are carried on shaggy-haired stems in late summer. SE U.S. Seedlings in deep 3.5-inch pots. Zone 6.
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Sisyrinchium 'Pole Star'
Sun; most soils; 6"×6"; May to June bloom
Paradoxes happen a lot in horticulture, as in the case of this white-flowered, yellow-eyed hybrid of blue-eyed grass. It's a lovely paradox, however, particularly in a cottage garden sort of setting, where it can seed itself around. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Solidago caesia
Sun; Well-aerated soil; 2'×1'; August to October bloom
This woodland perennial is a veritable fountain of gold in late summer and early fall, when axillary flower clusters line its arching, glaucous, purple-stained stems. One of the glories of the eastern North American forest, it should be near the top of the candidates list for any shade or woodland-edge garden (as should S. flexicaulis). It's also well-behaved (although you can expect some seedlings). Our plants are grown from seed we collected locally. C & E North America. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Solidago rigida ssp. humilis 'Golden Rockets'
Sun; light to medium soil; 2'×18"; August to September bloom
Here's an excellent compact form of the goldenrod species we'd name as our favorite if compelled to do so. Downy silver-green stems terminate in numerous dense, domed heads of golden-yellow flowers. The whole grows from a handsome clumping (rather than running) rosette of large, fuzzy, gray-green basal leaves that look nothing like those of most other goldenrods. One of the best late-blooming perennials for borders and native plantings, it pairs beautifully with ornamental grasses. C & E North America. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Solidago speciosa
Sun; fertile soil; 3'-4'×2'; September to October
Conical plumes of lemon-yellow flowers are held high on the burgundy-purple stems of this splendiferous clump-forming goldenrod. Gray-green leaves add to the picture. There's no better perennial for the sunny fall border. C & E North America. Seedlings. Zone 3.
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Stylophorum diphyllum
Part shade; most soils; 15"×1'
One of the most satisfactory natives for the woodland perennial border, celandine poppy is splendid combined with other shade-lovers, especially those that contrast tellingly with its bright yellow poppy-flowers. It also has an endearing way of popping up here and there from seed (unwanted volunteers are easily edited). C and E U.S. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Stylophorum lasiocarpum
Part shade; humus-rich soils; 12"×18"; May to June bloom
One of two celandine poppies native to China, this woodlander produces somewhat paler yellow flowers than those of the native Stylophorum diphyllum, and they appear slightly later in spring. Vegetatively, it differs in the more jagged segments of its lobed leaves, and in possessing red (rather than yellow) sap. As with our native species, it's splendid combined with other shade-lovers, especially ones that go well with yellow. C & E China. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Syneilesis aconitifolia
Part shade; most soils; 2'×2'
Ghostly, silver-furred, hula-skirted shoots nose through the soil in spring, unfurling into large spoked leaves with narrow, jagged-toothed segments. The lacy foliage forms large shaggy shredded hummocks that are especially striking next to bold-leaved things such as hostas and rodgersias. Clusters of unremarkable sort-of-white flowers are held high above the leaves in early summer. E Asia. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Thalictrum aquilegifolium
Part to full sun; moist humus-rich soil; 3'×2'; May to June bloom
With its clouds of relatively early, lilac-pink flowers above lush clumps of ferny blue-green foliage, this is still one of the best meadow rues for the garden, some 300 years after its introduction. As is the case with quite a few old-timers, it surpasses a goodly number of the recent, highly touted varieties that have displaced it from the catalogs. Europe to N Asia. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Tradescantia bracteata
Full to partial sun; light soil; 1'×1'; May to June bloom
Our native spiderworts include several wonderful "dwarf" species that make much better garden subjects than the rangy hybrids that most gardeners know. This one has proporionately large purple flowers in late spring and early summer on compact, well-behaved plants that go dormant in summer (and that usually self-sow). C North America. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Trollius ircuticus
Full to partial sun; moist humusy soil; 2'×1'; May to June bloom
The glowing golden-orange flowers of this showy and rarely offered Siberian native open in late spring, revealing a central flame of staminodes. One of the nicest and hardiest of the globeflowers. Seedlings. Zone 3.
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Veratrum nigrum
Part shade; porous humusy soil; 5'×2'; July to August bloom
This big, bizarre, beautiful woodlander produces bold clumps of broad pleated leaves surmounted in summer by towering, feathery, dark maroon panicles. The whole suggests a chimera involving a ten-gallon hosta and a gargantuan astilbe from the dark side. Extraordinary. We have only a few to sell this year. Eurasia. Seedlings. Zone 6.
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1/$9
Verbascum atroviolaceum  
Sun; any soil; 2'×1'
A thing apart from most verbascums: first, in bearing relatively compact, airy candelabras of black-purple flowers in mid-spring above rosettes of raspy sage-like leaves; second, in being a long-lived perennial (rather than pursuing the usual biennial lifestyle). Wonderful for grouping in cottage gardens and other informal plantings. Caucasus. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Verbascum roripifolium
Full sun; most soils; 40"×18"; June to August bloom
Who ever thought a mullein could do "airy"? Elegant, showy candelabras of large lemon-yellow flowers hover on strong tall wiry stems that arise from ferny-leaved rosettes. Whether floating in the foreground or taking up the rear, this dandy biennial makes an arresting addition to perennial borders and cottage gardens. Being a mullein, it will of course produce some seedlings, which are easily edited.
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Verbena stricta
Sun; dry to moist soil; 3'×1'; July to September bloom
Lengthening candelabras of lavender flowers continue throughout summer. Attractive and adaptable, hoary vervain combines beautifully with blue, purple, or silvery companions such as eupatoriums, Eryngium yuccifolium, and Lobelia siphilitica. N America. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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Viola hirsutula  
Part shade; any soil; 8"×8"; May bloom
An outstanding foliage plant for shade, this handsome violet is a keeper, with bold, silver-green, purple-veined leaves and relatively large lavender flowers. Thanks, Aaron Floden, for identifying it for us! E U.S. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Viola labradorica hort.
Full to part sun; any soil; 3"×8"; May to June bloom
Spreading mats of heart-shaped leaves that flush maroon in spring before fading to purple-green are spangled with purple violets in spring. An excellent ground cover for informal garden areas. This could be the nearly identical Viola riviniana, which is usually what goes under this name in horticulture. We have yet to check the stipules on our seedlings to verify their identity. Seedlings. Zone 3.
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Xerophyllum asphodeloides
Sun; coarse soil; 3'×18"; May to June bloom
This exquisite, incomparable, and virtually unobtainable pine barrens native produces large bottlebrush clusters of fragrant white flowers on tall fleshy stems that arise from Beatle-like mops of arching grassy leaves. Mid-Atlantic to SE U.S. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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1/$9
Yucca glauca pink-flowered form
Sun; coarse soil; 5'×3'; June to July bloom
Large rose-pink flower segments add even further ornamental oomph to our favorite yucca. Superior to the commonly cultivated Yucca filamentosa in every way, this spectacular Plains native slowly matures into a large bristling evergreen clump of narrow bayonet leaves. Showy, fleshy, flowers with greenish-white "petals" &ndash cupped by huge, waxy, rose-pink "sepals" – nod in early summer from an immense scape that resembles a gargantuan asparagus spear. C U.S. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Shrubs, Trees & Woody Vines
Plant Name No./Price
Calycanthus chinensis
Part shade to sun; any soil; 6'×6'; May to June bloom
Introduced a few years back as Sinocalycanthus, this highly sought-after deciduous shrub with large glossy leaves and white camellia-like flowers has now been merged with the genus that contains our "native" sweetshrubs. But the flowers are much showier (though not fragrant). China. 5-7" seedlings Zone 6.
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Chaenomeles cathayensis (Cydonia cathayensis)
Sun; most non-soggy soils; 12'×12'; April bloom
Luscious pink flowers in early spring and large, fragrant, amber-green, purple-flushsed quinces in fall adorn this large, upright, heavily armed shrub. China. Seedlings. Zone 6.
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Clerodendrum trichotomum var. fargesii  
Sun to light shade; most soils; 10'×10'
A relatively hardy and heavily fruiting variant of one of the best shrubs for late-season display, this carries the usual white flowers with maroon sepals (the whole appearing pink) in summer, followed by deepest blue berries that nestle within the persistent calyces. It suckers to form thickets. Asia. Seedlings. Zone 6.
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Diospyros lotus
Sun; most soils; 25'×20'
Widely grown in Asia for its small persimmons (produced on female plants) that have a date-like flavor, this rarely cultivated tree (in the West) is essentially a reduced version of our native Diospyros virginiana, with shiny oval leaves and inconspicuous flowers borne on small, open-crowned, sinuously branched trees with scaly gray bark. Perfectly hardy in most of the U.S., it could be more often used in ornamental and culinary plantings. Europe & Asia. Unsexed, 4-6" seedlings. Zone 5.
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Diospyros virginiana    
Sun to light shade; most soils; 50'×30'
Our native persimmon is another of our many favorites, featuring a picturesque, craggy habit; chunky, alligator-hide bark; and showy (and tasty) orange fruit in fall, most heavily borne when both males and females are present. These are unsexed seedlings. C & E U.S. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Euonymus planipes hort.
Sun to light shade; most soils; 9'×9'
Dangling clusters of astonishing large (for a euonymus), five-angled fruits turn maroon-red in fall, resembling cascades of miniature Japanese lanterns. The fruit capsules split wide in fall, displaying showy payloads of bright red-orange seeds, just as the leaves flush burgundy-red. This large shrub may simply be a form of Euonymus sachalinensis, a matter which appears to still be under some taxonomic debate. Under whatever name, it's one of the showiest shrubs for the fall garden. Green twigs and large pointed purple buds contribute considerable winter interest. NE Asia. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Euonymus sachalinensis
Sun to light shade; most soils; 9'×9'
And here are seedlings of the species to which the horticultural entity Euonymus planipes belongs (according to some taxonomists). It's much the same plant, but with fruit capsules of about a quarter the size. NE Asia. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Lonicera spinosa var. albertii
Full sun; gritty soil; 2'×2'; May to June bloom
With its low cascading habit, willowy gray-green leaves, and refined bearing, this is not the sort of thing you expect in a honeysuckle – until it opens its proportionately large, fragrant, lavender-pink, trumpet-shaped flowers in late spring. We have a limited supply of this rare beauty from Central Asia. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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Pinus bungeana
Sun; light to medium soils; 30'×25'
The ghostly, silver and gray, patchwork bark of this open-branched, multi-stemmed pine forms a gleaming framework in the landscape. Lacebark pine is one of those rare plants that's equally striking from a distance and up close. China. Seedlings. Zone 5.
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1/$7
Ptelea trifoliata
Full sun to light shade; most soils; 12'×12'
We typically offer the gold-leaved form of this handsome native, but the regular green type is one of the best small trees for North American gardens, growing rather rapidly into a single- or multi-trunked specimen with lush, lustrous, 3-parted leaves, dotted in late summer with clusters of large wafer-like fruits. This tree also draws in giant swallowtail butterflies, for which it's a larval host plant. E, C & SW North America. Seedlings. Zone 4.
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1/$6
Securinega suffruticosa (Fleuggea suffruticosa)
Sun; light to medium soil; 6'×6'; July to August bloom
When visiting the Arnold Arboretum's demonstration gardens, we're always drawn to this little shrub from the Euphorbiaceae, which has a character all its own. Its gracefully arching branches are lined with oval, light green leaves that turn yellow in fall, and are crowded with tiny chartreuse flowers in summer. We recommend coppicing the plant in spring to maintain a dense compact habit. E Asia. Seedlings. Zone 5.
1/$7
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Vitex negundo var. heterophylla Sun; most soils; 4'×4'; June to August bloom
Seedlings of what to our mind is the best of the chaste trees for our latitude and attitude. The finely palmate leaves are smaller and lacier than those of Vitex agnus-castus; the lavender flowers are borne in airier sprays; and the arching habit is more graceful and relaxed. Height is under 5 feet here in Zone 6, where we treat the shrub as a dieback. Unpruned specimens in zones 7 and warmer will reach twice that height or more. E Asia. Seedlings. Zone 6.
1/$7
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Zanthoxylum simulans
Sun to partial shade; medium soil; 12'×12'; May to June blooom
Sichuan cuisine makes considerable use of the reddish, zingy-flavored, peppercorn-like seed capsules (as anyone who has experienced their numbing tingling effect on the palate will attest) that ripen in late summer on female plants. But this large upright shrub is also valuable as an ornamental, thanks to its handsome, shiny, compound leaves; its gray, spiny (evolving to warty) bark; and its late summer crop of red Sichuan peppercorns (if you have both a staminate and a pistillate plant). Admittedly, the small greenish flowers that precede the fruits are not attention-grabbers. We offer unsexed seedlings, so you may or may not get peppercorns (and you certainly won't if you have only one plant). China and Taiwan. Seedlings. Zone 6.
1/$8
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ODYSSEY PERENNIALS
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South Lancaster, MA   01561

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